Miscellaneous

A little about me

My parents belonged to the post-colonial generation who were fortunate enough to receive higher education but also cast into the whirlwind of change from: colonial Africa to independence; traditional culture and laws to newly developing national constitutions and norms; and postcolonial peace to war and dictatorships in Uganda.

Growing up in this context of dramatic change shaped my parents both at a personal and national level. They are not free from the traumas of their forefathers and I, in turn, have been shaped by these time-defining events and forces. My schooling and formative years were spread between England, Kenya and Ivory Coast. I identify as both African and British, and now after living and raising my children in Denmark, I have also become quite Danish. Based in Copenhagen, my heart is rooted in several places. It is both a gift and a challenge.

As far back as I remember, I wanted to ease suffering and celebrate moments of joy. There are many ways to do this. My upbringing suggested a career in politics, business or medicine. I read pharmacology. However, during my second year, I bought a second-hand book on psychoanalysis for £1 in a Highgate antique shop which quickly led to a supplementary course in psychology at the London School of Economics (LSE). Suddenly a new path opened for me: a new language and way of relating, connecting and thinking about human existence, development and wellbeing. I wanted to understand the people in the world around me and also myself in the world. It is and will continue to be a lifelong work in progress. I am eternally grateful to have met wonderful people in my private life. I have been fortunate with some privileges, and humbled and wounded by other experiences. My own therapy, life experiences, long professional development, dedication and hard work have led me to where I am today, and I count myself fortunate to work as a psychologist.

Knowledge is a social endeavour and I am inspired by so many before me and around me. They are artists, thinkers, feelers, psychologists, philosophers, writers, poets, activists, friends, colleagues, various professionals, my previous managers at Næstved & Københavns Kommune and my long-time running supervisor.

Last, but not least, I admire the many clients whom I have been privileged to meet – to hear their stories and witness their courage as they faced their fears, their pain or the unknown in their search for change and new meaning in their lives.

“I’m not sure if resilience is ever achieved alone. Experience allows us to learn from example. But if we have someone who loves us – I don’t mean who indulges us, but whol loves us enough to be on our side – then its easier to grow resilience.” Maya Angelou.

“You should be angry. You must not be bitter. Bitterness is like cancer. It eats upon the host. It doesn’t do anything to the object of its displesure. So use that anger. You write it. You paint it. You dance it. You march it. You vote it. You do everything about it. ” Maya Angelou.

Diana Kamure, cand. psych. aut. Tlf.: +45 3044 2485 : psykologkamure@protonmail.com